Nothing like good news

Rumours have yet to be confirmed, but it appears that The Sun’s infamous Page Three may have been dropped. Since the 1970s, the newspaper has published explicit images, primarily topless women, to much controversy. In recent years, the page has been subject to the No More Page 3 campaign, founded by Lucy-Anne Holmes. This campaign, motivated by a hatred of sexism, the outdated nature of the page, and the easy access that children have to sexual material, has pressuring The Sun to remove the page. Fully information about the group can be found here.

If The Sun has decided to stop Page Three, then this really is a welcome snippet of goods news in a world which seems to have taken an even darker turn recently. Congratulations to the No More Page 3 campaign – you’ve made your mark and as far as I can see, it’s a pretty good one.

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The Most Inspiring Celebrity Feminist Quotes of 2014

This article is definitely a fluff piece and there are many, many supporters of equal gender rights out there who are far more qualified to speak on the topic, but on a personal level, the quotes included gave me just a little bit of hope. The vast majority of the celebrities included are very influential, particularly on young women. Emma Watson, Taylor Swift, Miley Cyrus – young people today grew up with these women. We fell in love with Hermione, belted out all the woes of being “Sixteen” with Taylor and followed the crazy rolle-coaster life of Hannah Montana.  These are the heroes of today’s “tweens”, and so it is really refreshing to see them, and others, use their fame and fortune to speak out in favour of feminism.

Link

Matt Forney: The Case Against Female Self-Esteem

A friend pointed this out on my university’s Feminist Society facebook page.  Read it and weep. I find it incredible that this man has actually managed to have any kind of relationship with a woman – his views are quite frankly disgusting. 

Guest post: An open letter to desperate men on social media – Feministing

By Chloe (26.07.13) from feministing.com

This is a guest post from Chelsea Fagan. Chelsea is a Senior Writer at Thought Catalog and the author of the forthcoming book “I’m Only Here for the WiFi”, out next month!

Hi Guys,

How are you? I hope the day finds you well, though I must admit that I imagine you don’t receive an enormous amount of sunlight in the basement-caves from which you are posting your lecherous, unsolicited comments. If I had to pinpoint an image in my mind, I would guess that it’s one of those basement rec-rooms from the 70s, complete with olive green shag carpeting and faux-wood paneling on the walls, with perhaps one of those tiny basement windows which is just big enough to allow the errant millipede to crawl through and get into your Hoarders-esque stash of Doritos.

But I digress.

I’m here today to talk to you about the comments you’ve been posting and messages you’ve been sending — notably on dating sites, but found just about everywhere — which are simply unacceptable. No unsuspecting woman deserves to wake up to see her picture of herself at a picnic, or her profile which talks about her love for Game of Thrones, being bombarded with commentary about how much you want to fuck her with a beer bottle or…

Read More Here

I came across this truly golden letter while reading Feministing.  As I’ve stated (ranted about) before, I truly detest internet users who take advantage of their relative anonymity to post vile and in this case, sleazy, comments on the internet, and because of that, this article really piqued my interest.  I just find it bizarre that men, and sometimes obviously women, are so willing to address strangers in this lewd and insulting manner.  It’s degrading and shows the depth of male privilege or perhaps better put, the privileges some men feel they have.  There’s no way any of the men referred to in this letter would approach a woman in the street and say these things.  Why? Because they would appear disrespectful, rude, idiotic, perverted, etc. which is exactly what many of them are. And yet because they can hide behind an avatar and a username, their eagerness to express their desires to fuck the same woman is entirely unhindered.  I love the internet, I think it’s a fantastic resource but this, sadly, is one of its greatest flaws.  The anonymity it can allow people, the abuse which it facilitates.  I truly believe that equality for women and for other groups of people, such as the LGBTQ community, cannot be achieved until action is taken to put an end to occurrences like these.  And articles such as this one are definitely a step in the right direction.

On another note, I noticed the guest writer is from Thought Catalog. Brilliant site, I’m a huge fan – definitely worth a read and once you start, you won’t be able to stop.

Siren Song

This is the one song everyone
would like to learn: the song
that is irresistible:

the song that forces men
to leap overboard in squadrons
even though they see beached skulls

the song nobody knows
because anyone who had heard it
is dead, and the others can’t remember.
Shall I tell you the secret
and if I do, will you get me
out of this bird suit?
I don’t enjoy it here
squatting on this island
looking picturesque and mythical
with these two feathery maniacs,
I don’t enjoy singing
this trio, fatal and valuable.

I will tell the secret to you,
to you, only to you.
Come closer. This song

is a cry for help: Help me!
Only you, only you can,
you are unique

at last. Alas
it is a boring song
but it works every time.

Margaret Atwood

Also I would recommend checking out this article.  If I could, I would put every poem up on this blog – some incredible women, who created inspiring work. 

“I suspect it’s…

Quote

“I suspect it’s difficult for men to imagine a world in which their bodies have long been inextricably linked to their value as an individual, and that no matter how encouraging your parents were or how many positive female role models you had or how self-confident you feel, there is an ever-present pressure that creeps in from all sides, whispering in your ear that you are your body and your body defines you. A world where, from the time of pubescence on, you can feel the constant and palpable weight of the male gaze, and not just from your male peers but from teachers and sports coaches and the fathers of the children you baby-sit, people you’re supposed to respect and trust and look up to, and that first realization that you are being looked at in that way is the beginning of a self-consciousness that you will be unable to shake for the rest of your life.

Even if they are never verbalized, the rules of bodily conduct for females become clear early on: when school administrators reprimand you for the inch of midriff that shows when you lift your hands straight in the air or youth group leaders tell you that the sight of your unintentional cleavage is what causes godly young men to fall, you learn that your body is dangerous and shameful and that it’s your responsibility to cloister it in a way that is acceptable to everyone else. You learn that your body is a topic of public debate that everyone is entitled to weigh in on, from a male classmate telling you that those jeans make your ass look huge to the male-dominated United States Congress dictating the parameters that rape must fall within to be considered legitimate. To be a woman, and to live life in a woman’s body, is to be held to a set of comically paradoxical standards that make you constantly second-guess yourself and jump through a million hoops in pursuit of an impossible perfection.”

 – Stop Catcalling Me from Thought Catalog

(Found via ceedling)